Anachronistic Fairytales

if two people love each other, there can be no happy end to it
Ernest Hemingway

“In the land of Erin there dwelt long ago a widow who had an only son. He was a clever boy, so she saved up enough money to send him to school, and, as soon as he was old enough, to apprentice him to any trade that he would choose. But when the time came, he said he would not be bound to any trade, and that he meant to be a thief.”

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The Shifty Lad

Andrew Lang, The Lilac Fairy Book

The Shifty Lad
H.J. Ford
The Lilac Fairy Book, Andrew Lang

The Shifty Lad

H.J. Ford

The Lilac Fairy Book, Andrew Lang

The Shifty Lad
H.J. Ford
The Lilac Fairy Book, Andrew Lang

The Shifty Lad

H.J. Ford

The Lilac Fairy Book, Andrew Lang

“There thou wilt find an open space, and in the midst of it a tall tree. Under the tree is a fountain, and by the fountain a marble slab, and on the slab a bowl of silver, with a silver chain. Dip the bowl in the fountain, and throw the water on the slab, and thou wilt hear a might peal of thunder, till heaven and earth seem trembling with the noise. After the thunder will come hail, so fierce that scarcely canst thou endure it and live, for the hailstones are both large and thick. Then the sun will shine again, but every leaf of the tree will by lying on the ground. Next a flight of birds will come and alight on the tree, and never didst thou hear a strain so sweet as that which they will sing. And at the moment in which their song sounds sweetest thou wilt hear a murmuring and complaining coming towards thee along the valley, and thou wilt see a knight in black velvet bestriding a black horse, bearing a lance with a black pennon, and he will spur his steed so as to fight thee. If thou turnest to flee, he will overtake thee. And if thou abidest were thou art, he will unhorse thee. And if thou dost not find trouble in that adventure, thou needest not to seek it during the rest of thy life.”

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The Lady of the Fountain

Andrew Lang, The Lilac Fairy Book

The Lady of the Fountain
H.J. Ford
The Lilac Fairy Book, Andrew Lang

The Lady of the Fountain

H.J. Ford

The Lilac Fairy Book, Andrew Lang

The Lady of the Fountain
H.J. Ford
The Lilac Fairy Book, Andrew Lang

The Lady of the Fountain

H.J. Ford

The Lilac Fairy Book, Andrew Lang

“'Have a care,' answered the queen, 'for it is not with a smile as on the other days that he will greet you. Furiously he will meet you, and will ask you in his wrath if you have got the sword, and you will reply that you have got it. Next he will want to know how you got it, and to this you must say that but for the knob you had not got it at all. Then he will raise his head to look at the knob, and you must stab him in the mole which is on the right side of his neck; but take heed, for if you miss the mole with the point of the sword, then my death and your death are certain. He is brother to the king of the oak windows, and sure will he be that the king must be head, or the sword would not be in your hands.' After that she kissed him, and bade him good speed.”

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The King of the Waterfalls

Andrew Lang, The Lilac Fairy Book

The King of the Waterfalls
H.J. Ford
The Lilac Fairy Book, Andrew Lang

The King of the Waterfalls

H.J. Ford

The Lilac Fairy Book, Andrew Lang

The King of the Waterfalls
H.J. Ford
The Lilac Fairy Book, Andrew Lang

The King of the Waterfalls

H.J. Ford

The Lilac Fairy Book, Andrew Lang

“There was once a king in Ireland, and he had three daughters, and very nice princesses they were. And one day, when they and their father were walking on the lawn, the king began to joke with them, and to ask them whom they would like to be married to. ‘I’ll have the king of Ulster for a husband,’ says one; ‘and I’ll have the king of Munster,’ says another; ‘and,’ says the youngest, ‘I’ll have no husband but the Brown Bear of Norway.’ For a nurse of hers used to be telling her of an enchanted prince that she called by that name, and she fell in love with him, and his name was the first name on her tongue, for the very night before she was dreaming of him.”

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The Brown Bear of Norroway

Andrew Lang, The Lilac Fairy Book

The Brown Bear of Norroway
H.J. Ford
The Lilac Fairy Book, Andrew Lang

The Brown Bear of Norroway

H.J. Ford

The Lilac Fairy Book, Andrew Lang

The Brown Bear of Norroway
H.J. Ford
The Lilac Fairy Book, Andrew Lang

The Brown Bear of Norroway

H.J. Ford

The Lilac Fairy Book, Andrew Lang

aliczia asked: I'm so happy I've found your blog, what an amazing collection.

Thank you! It’s so encouraging to hear that.

“She was one Thursday at the market of Enniscorthy, when what did she see walking among the tubs of butter but the Dark Man, very hungry-looking, and taking a scoop out of one tub and out of another. ‘Oh, sir,’ says she, very foolish, ‘I hope your lady is well, and the baby.’ ‘Pretty well, thank you,’ says he, rather frightened like. ‘How do I look in this new suit?’ says he, getting to one side of her. ‘I can’t see you plain at all, sir,’ says she. ‘Well, now?’ says he, getting round her back to the other side. ‘Musha, indeed, sir, your coat looks no better than a withered dock-leaf.’ ‘Maybe, then,’ says he, ‘it will be different now,’ and he struck the eye next him with a switch. Friends, she never saw a glimmer after with that one till the day of her death.”

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The Fairy Nurse

Andrew Lang, The Lilac Fairy Book

The Fairy Nurse
H.J. Ford
The Lilac Fairy Book, Andrew Lang

The Fairy Nurse

H.J. Ford

The Lilac Fairy Book, Andrew Lang